ORPAS – University of Toronto

University program information changes regularly. For the most up-to-date details, view the online application.

Last updated: NDecember 19, 2016

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Department of Speech‑Language Pathology

Faculty of Medicine

There are 3 academic programs in speech-language pathology at the University of Toronto.

The Master of Health Science (MHSc) program prepares students for professional practice in speech‑language pathology. Academic and clinical experiences are integrated to provide the skills required for assessing and treating a wide variety of individuals with communication and swallowing disorders. The MHSc program can only be completed on a full‑time basis.

The Master of Science (MSc) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) are full‑time, research‑oriented programs that prepare students for advanced scientific work in the discipline. These 2 research programs do not prepare students for a clinical career.

For more information on how to apply to the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree programs, contact the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute directly at 416-978-0300 or visit http://www.rsi.utoronto.ca/how-apply.

Note: This application is for the Master of Health Science clinical program.

Timelines

All requirements of the MHSc program must be successfully completed within 2 consecutive years. There is no thesis requirement, but students are required to complete a capstone portfolio at the end of the second year.

The innovative curriculum links academic coursework to relevant clinical placements so that theoretical learning is immediately consolidated by practical experience. The 22‑month curriculum is organized into 9 units (5 academic and 4 clinical units):

  • The first year consists of Units 1 to 5:
    • Unit 1 (September‑December) provides coursework in anatomy, speech science, audiology, child language and clinical practice issues;
    • Unit 2 (following the winter break) is an 8-week unit that contains coursework related to developmental disorders, including language intervention, articulation and phonology, and fluency;
    • Unit 3 (March and April) is an 8‑week internship in developmental disorders;
    • Unit 4 (May and June) covers augmentative and alternative communication, voice, and aural rehabilitation; and
    • Unit 5 (July or August) is a 4‑week summer internship in speech, language and/or hearing disorders.
  • Entrance into the second year of the program is contingent upon successful completion of all first‑year courses and clinical placements. In the second year of the program, students complete Units 6 to 9 as follows:
    • Unit 6 (September – December) includes coursework in neurogenic and structurally related disorders;
    • Unit 7 (January – February) includes an 8‑week internship in neurogenic disorders;
    • Unit 8 (March ‑ April) includes advanced course work in the principles of clinical practice, research, and clinical analysis of communication disorders and swallowing. A capstone portfolio requirement that documents achievements and competencies in academic and clinical areas is also completed; and
    • Unit 9 (May – July) is a 10‑week clinical internship during which students assess and treat clients with a variety of communication disorders.

Students are required to do the following:

  • Accept clinical placements anywhere assigned at a designated placement site;
  • Arrange their own travel and accommodation; and
  • Cover related expenses (budget around $3,000).

Students can expect that at least 1 clinical placement will take place outside of the Greater Toronto Area (Burlington to Barrie to Oshawa).

Important:  By accepting an offer of admission to the MHSc program, students agree to accept placements as assigned. Clinical placements are final and may not be appealed. Although personal preferences are considered for clinical placements, individual placement requests cannot be guaranteed.

Overview of Admission Process for the MHSc Program

The Department of Speech-Language Pathology will admit 50 students to the MHSc program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Applications are reviewed by members of the Admission and Awards Committee and are ranked relative to other applications. The following 2 main criteria are taken into consideration during the assessment of an applicant’s file:

  1. The strength of the applicant’s previous academic background.
    • Previous academic performance and overall quality of previous academic work are considered, as demonstrated by indicators such as coursework, grades or marks, scholarships or awards obtained and academic letters of reference.
    • No single academic background is considered best suited as preparation for the study of speech‑language pathology.
  2. The applicant’s potential for clinical practice.
    • Applicants are required to complete a minimum of 14 hours of volunteer or work experience in a clinical setting under the supervision of a qualified speech‑language pathologist.
    • Potential for clinical practice is judged based on the extent and quality of the clinical experience and the letter(s) of recommendation from the clinical supervisor(s).
    • In addition, indicators of excellence in interpersonal skills, as demonstrated in academic and extracurricular activities, are considered during the admission process.

Speech-Language Pathology Admission Requirements

Undergraduate Degree

Applicants must hold the equivalent of a 4‑year University of Toronto bachelor’s degree from an approved university (which includes 20 full course equivalents, but does not necessarily need to be an honours degree) with at least a mid‑B standing in the final year (or in the last 5 full course equivalents).

For students with a 3‑year degree, additional coursework must be in accordance with the structure for a 4‑year degree at the University of Toronto, as outlined in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Calendar.

Course work should consist of 75% liberal arts/science content. All applicants are required to be either a Canadian citizen or permanent resident (landed immigrant) of Canada at the time of the application. International students are not accepted.

Important: The University of Toronto uses the ORPAS sub-grade point average (GPA) to determine eligibility for the MHSc program and the sub-GPA is part of the overall assessment process. The sub-GPA is calculated using the most recent 10 full course equivalents. If an applicant is currently enrolled in the fourth year of a baccalaureate program, this calculation will start with the final fall grades (completed December 31) and will move back in chronological order, based on the transcript. Where grades must be extracted from a term to achieve the equivalent of 10 full courses, the weighted average of that year (e.g., the second year) will be used.

Find more information about how the sub-GPA is calculated.

Prerequisite Courses

Applicants are also required to complete the stated prerequisite undergraduate university level courses with a final grade of B+ in each course in order to be considered for the MHSc program. The prerequisite courses include the following:

  • Child development (1 half course)
  • Elementary statistics (1 half course)
  • General linguistics (1 half course)
  • Human physiology (1 full course)
  • Phonetics (1 half course)
  • Research methods (1 half course)

To determine whether a particular course meets a prerequisite requirement, consult the MHSc program website. If a course is listed on the website, then it has been approved and will satisfy the specified prerequisite course.

Note: Course offerings are subject to change and not all courses listed on the MHSc prerequisite section of the website are necessarily offered at any given time. It is the applicant’s responsibility to confirm course offerings with the institution of interest.

To claim a course as a prerequisite that is not listed on the MHSc prerequisite section of the website, students must obtain pre-approval from the department and include it as an attachment in the application. For more information on this pre-approval process please email the Student Affairs Assistant or phone 416-978-1794.

Important: It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all prerequisite course requirements have been satisfied. If a course is not listed on the MHSc website as a suitable prerequisite and if pre-approval was not obtained and submitted with the application, the applicant may be disqualified from the admission process.

Note: Requests from applicants to verify courses after the application deadline has passed will not be accepted.

Claiming Prerequisites in the ORPAS Application

Using the online ORPAS Prerequisite Form, applicants are required to submit a list of the courses taken to satisfy the prerequisites. Further documentation beyond the ORPAS Prerequisite Form, is not required if prerequisite courses are already listed as approved on the departmental website. Note: Pre-approval documentation must be submitted with the application for each prerequisite course that is not listed on the website (see Prerequisite Courses section for more details). Prerequisite courses should be completed within the last 10 years. Web‑based courses and summer courses may be used to fulfill prerequisite requirements.

For each prerequisite course that is claimed, include the following on the ORPAS Prerequisite Form:

  • The course title
  • The complete course code (department and number)
  • The university at which the course was completed
  • The date the course was completed
  • The weight or credit value (full/half year) of the course
  • The final grade or mark for the course, if available
    • If a final grade or mark is not yet available, indicate “IP” (in progress) in the final grade section for courses currently being taken and “FP” (future/planned) in the final grades section for courses that are planned for the future.

Note:  Final transcripts stating conferral of the bachelor’s degree and final marks for all prerequisite courses must be received by ORPAS no later than August 1, 2017.

Offers of admission are conditional until the following are received no later than August 1, 2017:

  • Proof of degree conferral with a minimum of a mid-“B” average in the final year
  • A minimum of “B+” in each prerequisite course

Important:  Please ensure that the ORPAS Prerequisite Form in the Personal Submissions section of the application is completed accurately. Only courses that are listed in this section of the application may be claimed towards the prerequisite requirements. Errors in documentation of prerequisite courses on this form may result in the disqualification of an applicant from the admission process.

Confidential Assessment Form

Applicants must arrange to have 2 academic referees complete the Confidential Assessment Form and an academic reference letter (see the ORPAS online application) sent directly to  ORPAS.

The Confidential Assessment Form should be forwarded to the academic referees to complete. Referees must submit a separate letter of reference that addresses the points listed on the Confidential Assessment Form. It should be written on university letterhead and signed by the referee, indicating the referee’s name, academic rank and telephone number or email address. Referees must be full‑time faculty members (normally with a rank of lecturer, assistant professor, or higher).

Note: College instructors are not considered to be appropriate academic referees.

Important: The receipt of Confidential Assessment Forms and/or reference letters after the application deadline may negatively impact an application.

Clinical Experience

A minimum of 14 hours of experience supervised by a speech-language pathologist in a communication disorders setting in a volunteer, educational or paid capacity is required to apply to the MHSc program.

Relevant experience may be sought at any facility where services are supervised by a qualified speech‑language pathologist. A qualified speech‑language pathologist will hold licensure, registration or certification from a regulatory body or professional association and/or certification from Speech-Language and Audiology Canada.

The clinical experience should involve direct interaction with individuals with communicative disorders. It might also include observation of speech‑language pathologists working with individuals with communicative disorders or discussions with speech‑language pathologists about the profession.

Clinical Reference Form

A clinical reference from the primary supervisor of the speech‑language pathology clinical experience is required as part of the application package. Letters from program directors who were not directly involved in supervision of the applicant and letters from communication disorder assistants are unacceptable.

Clinical Reference Forms should be forwarded to the clinical referees to complete. Referees must also submit a separate letter of reference that addresses the points listed on the Clinical Reference Form. It should be written on letterhead and signed by the referee, indicating the referee’s name, position, and telephone number or email address.

For applicants who have completed college diplomas or undergraduate degrees in communication disorders, the clinical coordinator may complete the Clinical Reference Form.

Applicants who have completed more than one supervised clinical experience in a speech‑language pathology setting and had an additional experience where the clientele differed in either population or age group from the first experience, are strongly encouraged  to submit a Clinical Reference Form and letter for each site.

All Clinical Reference forms will be considered during the admissions process.

Important: The receipt of Clinical Reference Forms and/or reference letters after the application deadline may negatively impact an application.

Statement of Intent

All applicants must complete a Statement of Intent, found in the Personal Submissions section of the online application. There are 2 components to the Statement of Intent.

The first section should be a maximum of 3,000 characters and should address the following topics, in particular the first 4 items:

  1. Outline reasons for choosing speech‑language pathology as a career;
  2. Highlight specific personal attributes that would be relevant for the profession;
  3. Emphasize academic and non‑academic accomplishments;
  4. Outline reasons for choosing the MHSc program in speech‑language pathology at the University of Toronto; and
  5. Demonstrate current knowledge about the profession of speech‑language pathology.

Applicants may also wish to use this statement to explain irregularities in their application and to outline any research experiences.

The second section of the Statement of Intent is a summary of volunteer experiences and should list:

  1. volunteer experiences in the field of speech‑language pathology and/or audiology in point form, including dates, duration, total hours, populations and the nature of activities in which the applicant participated; and
  2. other relevant volunteer experiences, including dates, duration, populations and activities.

Other Application Information

Education Outside of Canada

Applicants must be either a Canadian citizen or permanent resident (landed immigrant) of Canada to apply. International students are not accepted.

For education completed outside of Canada, applicants must send ORPAS all official academic records, including an official transcript of any completed courses or diplomas that have been conferred.

Academic records must be received directly from the originating institutions to be considered official. Photocopies of these records may be used to process an application, but note that official documents are required before any firm offer of admission is made.

Official English translations, done by a certified translator, must also be submitted for all non‑English documentation.

Language Requirement

All applicants to the MHSc program must have excellent oral and written English skills. This proficiency is required for both the academic and the clinical aspects of the program.

Applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate facility in the English language by completing one of the English proficiency tests listed in the University of Toronto, School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

The Department of Speech‑Language Pathology strongly prefers that the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) be used to satisfy this requirement. With respect to the internet‑based version of the TOEFL, applicants must achieve a minimum overall score of 100/120, with a minimum of 22/30 in the speaking section, and a minimum of 22/30 in the writing section. TOEFL candidates should use the institution code for the University of Toronto, which is 0982.

If it is impossible for an applicant to take the TOEFL, the department will accept one of the following tests:

  1. The Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) (minimum overall score of 85, with a minimum score of 80 on the composition component); or
  2. The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) (minimum score of 8).

Interview

The program may include interviews for selected candidates as part of the application process. Additionally, when the submitted documentation requires clarification, applicants may be invited for an interview at the Department of Speech‑Language Pathology. The meeting provides the opportunity to explore in‑depth issues, such as spoken and written language ability and areas of academic performance or interpersonal communication skills. For applicants who live outside of Toronto and are unable to attend a personal meeting, they may be invited to participate via teleconference or video conference.

Health Requirements

MHSc program applicants are expected to be in a state of health that allows for full participation in the academic and clinical programs without posing a risk to oneself or others.

No later than August 1, 2017, applicants who have been offered admission to the program are required to submit medical certification that confirms immunization against polio, diphtheria, tetanus, rubella, measles, mumps, chicken pox and hepatitis B, as well as medical certification confirming a negative tuberculosis test result. Other vaccines may also be required.

Notes:

  • Tuberculosis certification must be by skin test or chest x‑ray.
  • If a skin test yields a positive result, a follow‑up chest x‑ray is required and must be dated no earlier than one year prior to beginning the program. This must be repeated annually.
  • In addition, many clinical sites require annual flu shots that can be obtained at no additional cost from the University of Toronto health services, community flu shot clinics, and any doctor’s office in Ontario.

Police Record Checks

Many placements (e.g., school boards, social service sites) require police record checks. If admitted, applicants are strongly encouraged to complete and pay for this service. Failure to obtain a satisfactory police record check may result in an alternative or delayed placement that may also delay a student’s graduation date. More information will be provided at orientation.

Aboriginal Applicants

The department reserves one place annually for an Aboriginal applicant who satisfies all admission requirements as outlined in this document and on the department website. To apply under this category, contact the department directly before the application deadline to self-identify. Proof of Aboriginal status may be required.

Contact Information

Student Affairs Assistant
Department of Speech‑Language Pathology
Faculty of Medicine
University of Toronto
160‑500 University Avenue
Toronto ON  M5G 1V7

Email: slp.admissions@utoronto.ca
Telephone: (416) 978‑1794
Fax: (416) 978‑1596

Please do not directly contact any of the faculty or staff members in the department about admissions procedures. The department organizes several information sessions, given by faculty on the Admissions and Awards Committee, throughout the year for prospective students to learn more about the program, ask questions and meet current students. Applicants are strongly encouraged to attend one of these sessions.

For more information, see the Department of Speech-Language Pathology.

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Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Faculty of Medicine

Program Description

The program of study in Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at the University of Toronto is a Master of Science in Occupational Therapy (MScOT). The vision of the MScOT curricula is to create leaders in occupational therapy.

We are dedicated to creating graduates who are innovative professionals, life‑long learners and educators; essential contributors to health through occupation; and confident and competent scientist‑practitioners who demonstrate skills in, and commitment to, research.

The MScOT will prepare you in advanced academic and professional knowledge as well as applied research skills for leadership in occupational therapy practice. The program’s emphasis is on applying theory and research evidence to clinical practice through rigorous studies in occupational therapy and research production and utilization.

Graduates of the program will be eligible to write the certification examination of the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, a requirement for registration with the College of Occupational Therapists of Ontario and other professional regulatory colleges in Canada.

Graduates may also be eligible to practice occupational therapy elsewhere, by passing the licensing requirements specific to that state or country.

Successful applicants

  • will enter the program in September with an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing from a recognized university;
  • will complete the 24‑course requirement of the MScOT degree in 24 consecutive months of full‑time study, including summers and fieldwork; and
  • then graduate at November (fall) convocation.

The curriculum is presented in 6 consecutive terms, with between 4-6 concurrent courses in each term. First‑year courses include the following:

  • Research
  • Foundations in Occupational Science
  • Occupational Therapy Practice
  • Assessment in Occupational Therapy
  • Building Practice Through Mentorship
  • Musculoskeletal Structure and Function
  • Psychosocial, Neuro‑motor and Neuro‑cognitive Perspectives
  • Technology and Occupational Therapy

As a second‑year student, you will engage in intensive research projects and 3 parallel courses in enabling occupation across childhood, adulthood and older adulthood, respectively, while continuing with Building Practice Through Mentorship.

During both years, you will participate in full‑time fieldwork placements. Methods of study include interactive classes, divergent case method, skill labs, self‑study, computer‑assisted instruction and fieldwork.

MScOT Full-Time 24-Month Program Admission Requirements

The Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at the University of Toronto will admit approximately 89 students next September. You may apply at both the undergraduate and graduate level if you have permanent residency or hold Canadian citizenship. The specific admission requirements for entry to the program are outlined below.

Admissions Entry (An Appropriate Undergraduate Bachelor’s Degree Completed or in Progress)

The Department is interested in students from a variety of educational backgrounds and life experiences. We are committed to equity and welcome diversity.

You need to be intelligent and committed, and must strive for excellence, as the program is intense. Admission to the program is determined through an evaluation of academic and non‑academic materials, with academic grades more heavily weighted.

Graduate‑level courses, activity courses, practicums, non‑convertible grades (e.g., pass/fail) and Teacher Education degree courses will not be included in this calculation.

If a course is repeated, and both the original and repeated course are within the last 20 half courses, then the grades from both courses will be included in the GPA calculation.

  1. Minimum Academic Requirements
    • You must complete an appropriate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent from a recognized university, with a minimum mid‑“B” average in the final year (i.e., 5 full course equivalents). Note: The mid‑“B” average is a minimum requirement; a higher GPA, based on the last 10 full course equivalents completed, will be required to be competitive in the admission process. The average entering GPA of successful applicants, based on the last 10 full course equivalents completed, is expected to range from 3.65 to 3.75 on a 4-point scale.
    • If you are currently enrolled in the final year of a bachelor’s degree program, you are also eligible to apply. You must provide proof of your completed undergraduate bachelor’s degree (i.e., degree conferral) by June 30, 2017.
    • To determine initial ranking only, the Department will review the last 10 full course equivalents completed at the university undergraduate level. This includes summer session and part‑time courses taken beyond completing a 4‑year undergraduate degree.
    • If you are currently enrolled in the fourth year of a bachelor’s degree program, this calculation will start with your final fall grades (completed by December 31). Where grades must be extracted from an academic year to achieve the equivalent of 10 full courses, the average of that year (e.g., your fall and winter terms, which comprise the entire second academic year) will be used.
    • ORPAS uses the Undergraduate Grading Conversion Table to process GPA. Please review this table for details on the conversion scale used in this process. You must complete at least 10 full course equivalents (or 20 half course equivalents) at a recognized university for your application to be considered.
    • Transfer credits from the provincial college level that have not been assigned a grade by the university issuing the degree will not count toward this total.
  2. Application Materials: Non‑Academic
  3. These additional application materials provide a more comprehensive impression of you and what you would bring to this program and to the profession. It is expected that you have researched the profession of occupational therapy to make an informed career choice. Exposure to the profession of occupational therapy through paid or volunteer work, observational visits or job shadowing in various health care settings is strongly recommended.

    Statement of Intent

    • You must complete the Statement of Intent (2 questions for response), found in the “Personal Submissions” section of the online application.
    • The Department will not provide editing or advisory support as we are interested in your unique perspective based on your education and experience with OT.

    Resumé

    • The resumé must be single‑spaced and typed in 11‑point font on 8.5 x 11″ paper, with 1‑inch margins on all 4 edges, and must be no longer than 2 pages.
    • Your personal contact information (e.g., address, email) must not appear anywhere on the resumé.
    • Upload all resumés in an appropriate electronic file format to your ORPAS application.

    References

    • You must submit 2 references using the Confidential Assessment Forms included in the application.
    • The referees should be individuals who can address your aptitude for studies in a health care profession.
    • It is recommend that 1 letter come from a referee in academia who has evaluated your academic performance.
    • The second letter may also be from an academic source, though we recommend that it come from a professional source who can honestly comment on your ability to succeed in challenging environments.
    • Some examples of a professional reference include volunteer supervisors, research supervisors, OT mentors (via job shadowing), community leaders, and experienced health care professionals. References from family or friends are not acceptable.
    • The referee must submit the Confidential Assessment Form and accompanying reference letter directly to ORPAS.

     

  4. Health Requirements and Police Record Checks
    • Although not required for this admission application, you will be required to complete the Rehabilitation Sciences Health Form after acceptance and prior to registration.
    • Completing this form requires proof of a tuberculin test in each year of the program and up‑to‑date records of vaccinations for hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, diphtheria/tetanus and polio, as well as certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) at the Health Care Provider (HCP) level.
    • You are also expected to provide information about any physical, psychological or learning difficulties that may affect your education in the program. These requirements must be met before you can participate in fieldwork placements.
    • Many facilities also require a police record check. The Department strongly recommends admitted students obtain a Police Check or Vulnerable Sector Screening. The Department will provide admitted students with information on how best to obtain these verifications prior to orientation in September.
    • A fieldwork placement can be cancelled or delayed if you fail to obtain a clear satisfactory police record check or vulnerable person’s record check. This may affect your graduation date.
    • Contact the Department’s Director of Clinical Education or Program Manager before applying if you have concerns.

Other Considerations

Education Outside Canada

If you completed your education outside Canada, we advise you to make every attempt possible to obtain official academic records, including a copy of the diploma if you have graduated.

To be considered official, ORPAS must receive academic records directly from the originating institutions. Official documents will be required before any firm offer of admission is made.

Official English translations, done by a certified translator (either by a certified provincial translator or a translator approved by a Canadian Visa Post abroad) must also be submitted for all non-English documentation.

Copies of original documents and certified translations must be submitted at the time of application to ORPAS and the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy.

An interview may be required, at the request of the Department’s admission committee. World Education Services (WES) reports will be used only as a reference in assessing admission eligibility.

English Facility

It is essential that you have a strong command of English.

If English is not your first language and you have not completed a program of study where the language of instruction and examination was English, you must complete an acceptable English language facility test before an offer can be made. This is a condition of admission and must be met before the earliest date for offers of admission to this program.

This requirement must be satisfied through successfully completing 1 of the English proficiency tests listed in the University of Toronto’s School of Graduate Studies Calendar, with minimum acceptable scores as listed therein (with the exception of the Test of English as a Foreign Language [TOEFL]).

The Department strongly recommends that you use TOEFL with a minimum paper‑based score of 600, accompanied by the Test for Written English (TWE) with a minimum score of 5 or a minimum score of 100 on the internet‑based test.

TOEFL candidates should request that results be sent to institution code 0982. Arrange to have the English-language proficiency test scores forwarded by the examining agency directly to the University of Toronto – Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy by March 1, 2017.

If you graduated from a university in a country where the primary language is not English but the medium of instruction and examination at your university was English, please arrange for a letter to be sent directly to ORPAS from that institution confirming that the language of instruction and examination at that institution was English.

Satisfactory English language facility test results are required before any firm offer of admission can be made. An interview may be required at the request of the Department’s admission committee.

Students currently enrolled in, or graduating from, bilingual French-English universities based in Canada, may email the OT Department to request a written waiver of this testing requirement prior to the ORPAS application deadline.

Notices for All Applicants

Submitting an application to the program implies that you accept the admissions policies, procedures and methods by which you are selected. Due to the high application volume, we cannot provide personalized feedback to unsuccessful applicants.

The admissions policies and procedures are under regular review. Although the Department endeavours to inform you in a timely fashion, it reserves the right to change the admission and registration requirements at any time. Helpful information is posted throughout the application cycle (October to January).

Find more information about admission policies and procedures.

Deposit

Accepting an offer of admission to this program requires that you remit a non‑refundable enrollment deposit. The amount of this deposit is applied to your fees for the coming academic year.

Contact Information

Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
160-500 University Avenue
Toronto ON  M5G 1V7

Telephone: 416‑946‑8571
Fax: 416‑946‑8570
Email: ot.studentservices@utoronto.ca

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Department of Physical Therapy

Faculty of Medicine

The Program

The Master of Science in Physical Therapy (MScPT) is a 24‑month entry‑level‑to‑practice professional program. The purpose of the MScPT is to develop academic physical therapy practitioners who demonstrate the following:

Exemplary Practice

  • Share their knowledge with students, clients, policy‑makers and other professionals in academic health science environments.
  • Have enhanced competency in clinical skills.
  • Participate in clinical and health care research, contributing to the overall body of scientific knowledge.
  • Be cognizant of advanced technological practice.

Professionalism

  • Have the ability to act as self‑regulating professionals who exhibit strong personal, moral and ethical values.
  • Be cognizant of the changing laws, codes and guidelines that impact themselves and their clients.
  • Be creative entrepreneurs with sound business acumen, capable of excelling in professional practice in a wide variety of venues.

Leadership

  • Serve as role models for students and other health professionals as expert consultants in the fields of movement and physical capacity.
  • Serve as strong players with exemplary interpersonal skills, secure in their evolving role within changing health service delivery.

Citizenship

  • Be innovative leaders in physical therapy, rehabilitation and the health system.
  • Be strong advocates, collaborators and negotiators who proactively embrace interprofessional practice and health policy with an eye for maintaining and improving not only the health of clients, but the health system as a whole.

Program Administrator

W. Darlene Reid, BMR (PT), PhD, Chair and Professor

Courses of Instruction

PHT 1001H    Introduction to Professional Physical Therapy Practice, Evaluation and Research
PHT 1002Y    Cardiorespiratory and Exercise Physical Therapy Practice
PHT 1003Y    Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy Practice
PHT 1004Y    Clinical Internship I – Cardiorespiratory (H/P/FZ)
PHT 1014Y    Clinical Internship II – Musculoskeletal I (H/P/FZ)
PHT 1005Y    Neurological Physical Therapy Practice
PHT 1006Y    Research and Program Evaluation for Physical Therapy Practice I
PHT 1007Y    Clinical Internship III – Clinical Practice Neuroscience (H/P/FZ)
PHT 1008Y    Advanced Neuromusculoskeletal Physical Therapy Practice
PHT 1009Y    Clinical Internship IV – Musculoskeletal II (H/P/FZ)
PHT 1010Y    Research and Program Evaluation for Physical Therapy Practice II (Clinical Research Practice)
PHT 1011Y    Clinical Internship V – Selective (H/P/FZ)
PHT 1012Y    Research and Program Evaluation for Physical Therapy Practice III

PT Admission Requirements

Academic Assessment

In addition to the listed requirements, you may apply if you have permanent residency or hold Canadian citizenship.

Undergraduate Student Applicants

You must have completed an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing from a recognized university.

While the grade point average (GPA) cut-off varies from year to year, the cut-off for the 2016/2017 cycle was 3.81. Programs that lead to degrees in almost any discipline (e.g., liberal arts and science) are acceptable. For FAQs about degrees not accepted, see “GPA & Admissions”.

You may apply for admission during your fourth year of university study, provided you have fulfilled the prerequisite course requirements as outlined. If you are applying in the final year of a 4-year degree program, you must provide proof of degree completion prior to enrollment in the Physical Therapy program, and no later than June 30, 2017.

GPA is calculated based on your last 20 half courses of university academic study (i.e., the equivalent of 10 full courses or 20 half courses) completed by December 31 of the application year, and will include the following:

  • summer;
  • part‑time;
  • intersession;
  • correspondence;
  • repeated; and
  • failed university courses taken beyond the 4‑year undergraduate degree.

Due to the discrepancy in grade reporting across universities, to capture 20 half credits, the GPA must be calculated based on yearly versus term marks. Thus, where grades must be extracted from a year to achieve the equivalent of 20 half courses, the average of that entire year (including both the fall and winter terms) will be used.

Activity courses, non‑convertible grades (e.g., pass/fail), and Consecutive Bachelor of Education (BEd) undergraduate degree courses will not be included in this calculation. If a course is repeated, and both the original course and the repeated course are within the last 20 half courses, then the grades from both courses will be included in the GPA calculation.

GPA varies from school to school and the GPA ORPAS provides may not be equivalent to the GPA at your academic institution. ORPAS uses the Undergraduate Grading System Conversion Table to process GPA. Please review this table for details on the conversion scale used in this process.

For FAQs on how GPA is calculated, including specific examples, see GPA & Admission.

The School of Graduate Studies requires that all applicants to a master’s level program have at least a mid‑“B” average or better in the final year (i.e., 5 full course equivalents at the senior level). The mid‑“B” average is a minimum requirement, and a higher GPA based on the last 20 half courses completed will be required to be competitive in the admission process.

Note: You must complete at least 20 half courses (or the equivalent) at a recognized university for your application to be considered. Transfer credits from the college level that have not been assigned a grade by the university issuing the degree will not count toward this total.

Graduate Student Applicants

You are usually assessed on your last 20 half course equivalents completed by December 31 of the application year, including both undergraduate and graduate courses. You are required to have a minimum of a mid‑“B” average in all graduate courses, as per regulations set by our School of Graduate Studies.

Note: This is a minimum requirement and a higher GPA based on the last 20 half courses completed will be required to be competitive in the admission process, as outlined. If you are completing/have completed a graduate degree, you will otherwise be considered in the exact same manner as all other applicants. Please review the Undergraduate Student Applicants section for further information on GPA and degree requirements.

Applicants who Graduated from a Non‑Canadian University

If you completed your education outside of Canada, you may apply if you have permanent residency or hold Canadian citizenship. You must apply in the same manner as all other applicants.

To be considered, official academic records must be sent directly to ORPAS from the originating institutions. Photocopies of academic records may be used to process an application, but note that official documents will be required before any firm offer of admission is made. Official English translations, completed by a certified translator, must also be submitted for all non‑English documentation.

All requirements for applicants within this population are the same as within the Undergraduate Student Applicants section. Please review this information for degree and grade requirements. Transcripts will be evaluated for equivalency. Evaluation of equivalency will only be assessed through the application process.

To facilitate this process, you may wish to contact World Education Services (WES) to evaluate foreign credentials. You are responsible for incurred costs. WES reports will be used only as a reference in assessing admission eligibility.

WES reports are not mandatory, and you will not be penalized if a WES report is not submitted. If you utilize WES and have original documents sent to WES, original documents from the originating institution (i.e., your home university) must still be sent to ORPAS.

English Facility

You must demonstrate facility in the English language if you were educated outside Canada, English is not your primary language and you graduated from a university where English was not the language of instruction and examination. You must demonstrate facility in the English language through successfully completing the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), with minimum scores, as follows.

Paper‑based test: 600 with 5 on the TWE and 50 on the TSE.

Internet‑based test: 100/120 overall and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

Important: TOEFL candidates should request that results be sent to the University of Toronto, institution code 0982. There is no need to specify a department.

Alternatively, the School of Continuing Studies, University of Toronto, offers the certificate “Academic English”, whereby a minimum grade of “B+” in Level 60 meets the English-language facility requirement.

All official English facility results reports must be forwarded to the Department of Physical Therapy by March 1, 2017. English facility test results are valid for 2 years.

Note: Internationally educated physical therapists who successfully complete the national Canadian Physiotherapy Competency Examination (with the exception of individuals licensed to practice in Quebec) and are licensed for independent practice in Canada with a provincial regulating body may be eligible for our MScPT Advanced Standing Option.

Internationally educated physical therapists who are not licensed for independent practice in Canada are not considered for admission to the MScPT program.

The first step for internationally educated physiotherapists who wish to practice in Canada is to apply to the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators for an assessment of their educational qualifications. Internationally educated physiotherapists who are credentialed as having a degree that is substantially equivalent to a Canadian entry‑to‑practice degree are not considered for admission to the MScPT program.

If interested in bridging the gaps identified in The Alliance credential review or preparing for the Physiotherapy Competency Examination, please read more about the Internationally Educated Physiotherapists Bridging program.

Prerequisite Courses

You must have earned a minimum grade of “B-” (or 70%) in all prerequisite courses, as per the grade recorded on the transcript.

Note: Your prerequisite course grades will not be counted in your GPA calculation unless they are within the last 20 half credits you completed.

All applicants are required to complete the following:

  • 1 half course equivalent in human physiology*.
    • The course should cover the principles of human physiology, including the living cell, the internal environment; neuro-muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine systems; metabolism; reproduction; and homeostasis.
    • Plant physiology will not be accepted nor will a combined animal/plant physiology. (Combined human anatomy/physiology courses are acceptable as long as you have one full credit equivalent.)
  • 1 half course equivalent in human anatomy*.
    • Course content must be comprehensive, covering gross anatomy of the human musculoskeletal, visceral, and neurological systems. (Combined human anatomy/physiology courses are acceptable as long as you have 1 full credit equivalent.)
  • 1 full course (or 2 half course) equivalent(s) in life and/or physical sciences.
    • Examples of life sciences include anatomy, biology, basic medical sciences, pathology.
    • Examples of physical sciences include chemistry, physics, geology, geography, etc.
  • 1 full course (or 2 half course) equivalent(s) in social sciences and/or humanities and/or languages.
    • Examples of social sciences include anthropology, political science, economics, sociology, psychology.
    • Examples of humanities include history, religion, philosophy, classics, English, etc.
    • Examples of Languages include French, Italian, Spanish, etc.
  • 1 half course or equivalent in statistics or research methods*.
    • Statistics courses that may be acceptable include basic statistics, psychology statistics, geography statistics, kinesiology statistics, biometrics and quantitative research methods.
    • Calculus in itself is not acceptable as a statistics course and statistics content in other courses does not meet the requirement.

*Verify human physiology, human anatomy and statistics/research methods courses. Use this site to verify that your human physiology, human anatomy and statistics/research methods courses taken at universities across Canada are approved by the Department of Physical Therapy.

All prerequisite courses must be completed at a university level. All prerequisite courses must be completed within the last 7 years, or no earlier than September 2010 and no later than May 31, 2017. Web‑based and distance education courses are accepted, provided they are at a university level.

You must complete the prerequisite section of the online application.

  • You are required to include a URL that links to an online course description from the university academic calendar.
  • It is acceptable to include a link to a large PDF of the entire academic calendar.
  • Include the page number the course is located on at the end of the link (leave a space and then enter “pg x”).
  • All Canadian universities offer an “archived calendar” section on their website, and you are encouraged to use the archived calendar from the year you took the course if you cannot find the course in the current academic calendar.

In a small number of cases, applicants may not be able to provide a link to an online course description. If this applies to you, you are required to upload a paper copy of your detailed course descriptions directly to ORPAS, using the ORPAS SAM tool. You must submit your application to access SAM.

If mailing the course descriptions, do not exceed 3 pages, and be sure to include your full name and ORPAS identification number on the paperwork. ORPAS will forward the documentation to your university/program choice(s).

Non‑Academic Assessment

References

You must submit 2 references, 1 professional and 1 academic, using the ORPAS Confidential Assessment Forms in the application.

Both referees should be individuals who can address your aptitude for studies in a health profession. References from family members and friends are not acceptable. The forms must be submitted by the referees directly to ORPAS at the OUAC.

Find more information about references.

Review Physical Therapy Admissions FAQs.

Computer Administered Profile

There is an initial screening of the academic qualifications that narrows the pool of applicants. Only top applicants (ranked initially by marks) are invited to write the Computer Administered Profile (CAP) on‑site at the University of Toronto, in Toronto, Ontario, on Saturday, April 29, 2017.

If you are invited to the CAP exam, you will be notified by email in late March/early April.

  • The CAP is a 2‑hour evaluation with a series of short‑ and long‑answer questions.
  • The CAP is designed to assess personal characteristics/attributes, life experiences, knowledge of the profession and critical thinking/problem‑solving skills.
  • The CAP is not a personal profile nor is it an MCAT‑type exam that you can study for.

Typical questions will explore your understanding of the profession and the ability to problem solve. Enrollment selection is based on a combination of CAP exam score, weighted at 40%, and GPA, weighted at 60%, along with a file review.

To accommodate religious observances and special requirements, there will be a second CAP date: Wednesday, April 26, 2017. Requests to attend the alternative date should be emailed to the person indicated in the CAP invitation, and should be sent only after you have received your CAP invitation.

Distance from Toronto will not constitute a special requirement. You are responsible for your own travel costs to and from the CAP.

Additional Details

The 2‑year program is designed to prepare the graduate for entry‑to‑practice competency in physical therapy and is both academically and physically challenging. The program requires full‑time study and you must ensure that you are capable of being a full‑time student. The program does not allow for deferrals of admission.

Registration to Practice

Registration to practice physical therapy is required in all provinces and territories. Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland require that all applicants for licensure have passed the Physiotherapy Competence Examination, which includes both written and clinical components.

Upon successful completion of the Physical Therapy program at the University of Toronto, graduates may apply to the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators to take this examination. The university holds a 6‑year accreditation through Physiotherapy Education Accreditation Canada (PEAC) – the maximum award rating for master’s physical therapy education programs.

Health Requirements

If you are admitted to the program, registration procedures will be mailed to you and will include an immunization record that must be completed in full. It requests information about tuberculosis and other chest diseases, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, diphtheria/tetanus and polio. Evidence of a tuberculin test is required prior to registration.

Upon entry to the program, you are also required to provide a copy of a valid certificate standard in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at the Basic Rescuer (C) level. These courses are generally taken between August 1 of the year you are accepted and the first day of class.

All requirements must be met so you can participate in clinical practice.

Deposit

After accepting an offer of admission to this program, you are required to remit a non‑refundable enrollment deposit. The amount of this deposit is applied toward your fees for the coming academic year. The deposit is non-refundable.

Police Record Checks

Some sites (for example school boards, community care employers) require that employees, including students, have a completed police record check prior to the start of the clinical internship.

Being assigned to placements at these locations will require you to complete and submit the results of a Basic or Vulnerable Persons Criminal Record Check, at your own expense. You will be informed by the Department of Physical Therapy if this check is necessary prior to the beginning of the placement.

Failure to obtain a satisfactory police record check may result in an alternative or delayed placement and may affect your graduation date.

Contact Information

Department of Physical Therapy
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
Rehabilitation Sciences Building
160‑500 University Avenue
Toronto ON  M5G 1V7

Telephone: 416‑946‑8641
Fax: 416‑946‑8562
Email: physther.facmed@utoronto.ca

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